Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Hard Kit is all other accoutrements that are not clothing, weapons or armour. This includes pots and tents, and flint & steel, and other things like that.

Moderators: caedmon, Greg

User avatar
Iodo
Haeropada
Posts: 806
Joined: Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:58 pm
Location: North west england UK

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby Iodo » Thu Nov 21, 2019 9:52 pm

Glaenry wrote:I really do want to go the Barding route, the only thing really holding me back, is how sad it makes me that I won't be able to call myself a Ranger.

I thought that at first but would never go back now, something a bit different that few people have heard of seems more fun, but I think that's just me :P

Glaenry wrote: I am currently doing historical research to see what evidence there is for a scout style trekker in Nordic countries. I might also decide to take a Dwarvish word for my title, something that will fill me with just as much pride to be called as would the term Ranger.

I'm sure there's room for a human fells-ward of Erebor, if he be willing :mrgreen:
Gimli: It's true you don't see many Dwarf-women. And in fact, they are so alike in voice and appearance, that they are often mistaken for Dwarf-men.
Aragorn: It's the beards.
User avatar
theowl
Silent Watcher over the Peaceful Lands
Posts: 248
Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2011 7:15 am
Location: California
Contact:

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby theowl » Fri Nov 22, 2019 2:00 am

I had a few DSA sword about 10 years ago and they were ok. Very heavy blades, and very questionable cast hilts. The stuff I've handled from them in the past 3 or so years has been outstanding in construction and handling, so they've definitely come a long way.
Glaenry
Wayfarer
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2019 3:11 am

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby Glaenry » Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:24 am

I haven't held any of their older blades, but I can attest that the sword I got from them is good quality especially for the price (aside from the sharpening, needs work). Only about 2 pounds maybe 2.2. There's a pretty heavy profile taper for halfswording thrusts, but the balance of the weapon accounts for that: the weight is a further from the crossguard so it still has force for cuts. The sweet spot for cutting is also in a nice spot, not right at the tip but not too close to the cross guard, so cuts can be made at good distance. I have Kortoso's "Dunedain Rangers" youtube video on swordsmanship to thank for that tip. I found him before I found this forum or even the handbook, so when I saw his profile it was a bit like seeing a celebrity.
Anyway, sword is a good starting sword. I would recommend this model, haven't handled any others from them, so I won't speak for them.
User avatar
Taurinor
Amrod Rhandir
Posts: 548
Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 9:06 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby Taurinor » Wed Dec 11, 2019 4:15 pm

It looks like you’ve put some thought into this, and you seem to have most of the basics covered or plan to get them covered! I’m glad you’re looking to get a fire kit – flint and steel is one of the first hard kit items that I recommend folks acquire.

Have you thought about whether you’ll be using a tarp or the like? There’s been a lot of discussion about tarps and bedrolls on the forum; Greg wrote up a very well thought out examination of the subject.

Glaenry wrote:16. Water skin (not totally period)

Appropriate canteens tend to be one of the trickier things to acquire. As Elleth said, Ursus posted a how-to on disguising one, and I’ve put together a slight different take on disguising a bota, but the basic idea is very similar in both. It’s definitely a good way to make sure you have water out on the trail without spoiling the look if you haven’t decided on a more “correct” way to go.

Elleth wrote: Since our version of "historical trekking" springs mostly from 18th century historical trekking hobby of a generation or so ago, we've sort of inherited the copper corn boiler as a default trekking pot -

Greg really recommends Backwoods Tin:

http://www.backwoodstin.com/

( I believe item ck-19 - Corn Boiler)

I also really recommend Backwoods Tin (I have a bean boiler – ck-27), but the proprietor is currently not accepting orders, and while it’s one of the more available options and certainly doesn’t draw too much attention to itself, as Elleth said, the corn boiler may not be the best fit for all cultures of Middle-earth.

Elleth wrote:Taurinor has a redware pipkin from Townsends that I believe gives good service, albeit with more fragility and weight: https://www.townsends.us/products/redwa ... 180-p-1214

Medieval models are as I recall pretty darn close. Someone more expert than I could go into differences in design and glazing, but I still think it works PERFECTLY for his "common man from Bree" impression.

I do have a pipkin that I have trekked with on occasion, but it’s not that one. Mine is (I believe) stoneware and representative of an earlier style. I like it, but it holds about four and a half cups, which makes it just a bit too big for solo use. I’d happily use it to cook for a group in a shared gear sort of set up, though!

For solo use, I’m talking to a potter about having a smaller ceramic cookpot made, something that’ll hold two and a half cups or so. One of the reasons I’m going the custom route instead of going with the Townsends pipkin (which I really do like the look of) is that I want something with a fitted lid. I’ve found a lidded cookpot to be way more user-friendly on the trail – water boils faster, ashes don’t get in the food (as much), and it just seems to help keep the whole unit together a bit better.

Elleth wrote: A cheaper faster option is Taberna Vagantis. I purchased a larger kettle from Merek there last year - a buddy of his in fact makes the things, and he's willing to take a bit of custom direction.

I asked for mine without paint, which I think has worked well - I prefer the fire-blackened look.

That is a really quite reasonable price for a 1L pot. Hmm, this is dangerous information for me!

Glaenry wrote:I really do want to go the Barding route, the only thing really holding me back, is how sad it makes me that I won't be able to call myself a Ranger.

It’s more work, but there’s nothing wrong with putting together more than one impression! Udwin portrays both Aistan and Tungo Boffin. I imagine there will also be some similarities in basic gear for both Bardings and Rangers, so I don’t know that you would need to pick RIGHT away (but sooner is usually better).
- Ned Houndswood, Breelander
Richmond Fantasy-Inspired Hiking and Camping (on WordPress and Facebook)
Elleth
êphal ki-*raznahê
Posts: 2032
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2010 5:26 am
Location: in the Angle; New England

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby Elleth » Thu Dec 12, 2019 1:13 pm

Taurinor - I can't believe I forgot that bota tutorial you did - awesome!


Taurinor wrote:I do have a pipkin that I have trekked with on occasion, but it’s not that one. Mine is (I believe) stoneware and representative of an earlier style. I like it, but it holds about four and a half cups, which makes it just a bit too big for solo use. I’d happily use it to cook for a group in a shared gear sort of set up, though!

For solo use, I’m talking to a potter about having a smaller ceramic cookpot made, something that’ll hold two and a half cups or so. One of the reasons I’m going the custom route instead of going with the Townsends pipkin (which I really do like the look of) is that I want something with a fitted lid. I’ve found a lidded cookpot to be way more user-friendly on the trail – water boils faster, ashes don’t get in the food (as much), and it just seems to help keep the whole unit together a bit better.


Eeek! Sorry for misleading folk. I like the idea of a crockery cookpot, especially for a "non professional woodsrunner" persona. I'm just petrified of cracking the darn thing in the fire. How forgiving have you found them?

I'm also coming to think that the 4-6 cup/1-1.5 liter size is a very practical size. The ability to have that much hot water always available is a godsend, especially on a chilly evening. The little "pocket cauldron" I have is absolutely usable and definitely the kind of thing I think a Ranger would carry about - but it's also I think quite a specialized / "in a pinch" item rather than something I'd choose for a proper comfortable camp, even a solo one.

(Also, there's the question of societal material wealth: a cooking vessel filched from the kitchen - be it iron or crockery - is far more likely to be over almost anyone's campfire save that of a professional outdoorsman, for whom the dedicated expense is worth it.)

Oh oh oh - one more thing.
A norse-style shield boss would make an AWESOME little boiler once it's cleaned up. I can totally imagine some grizzled retired soldier down on his luck just making do with one of those. Plus, they're fairly cheap - even the hand-forged ones. Shades of US Civil War soldiers using busted canteens for frypans, there...



Taurinor wrote:That is a really quite reasonable price for a 1L pot. Hmm, this is dangerous information for me!

I KNOW, right? I totally don't need another little cauldron.

.... I totally want another little cauldron. :mrgreen:
Persona: Aerlinneth, Dúnedain of Amon Lendel c. TA 3010.
User avatar
Taurinor
Amrod Rhandir
Posts: 548
Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 9:06 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Re: Looking to have my kit critiqued part 2

Postby Taurinor » Thu Dec 12, 2019 4:44 pm

Elleth wrote:I like the idea of a crockery cookpot, especially for a "non professional woodsrunner" persona. I'm just petrified of cracking the darn thing in the fire. How forgiving have you found them?

I haven't blown mine up yet (knock on wood), which means they can't be TOO hard to use! The big thing is just to remember to warm it by the fire before you put in on the coals, and not to take it off the fire and put it straight down on a freezing cold rock or the like. Just avoid big jumps in temperature. I always put water in mine before warming it, as well; my thought is that having the water in there provides more mass for the energy (heat) to diffuse into, possibly making for less thermal shock (but that could definitely be more psuedoscience than anything, though!).

Elleth wrote:I'm also coming to think that the 4-6 cup/1-1.5 liter size is a very practical size. The ability to have that much hot water always available is a godsend, especially on a chilly evening. The little "pocket cauldron" I have is absolutely usable and definitely the kind of thing I think a Ranger would carry about - but it's also I think quite a specialized / "in a pinch" item rather than something I'd choose for a proper comfortable camp, even a solo one.

You're absolutely right that it's great to be able to heat that much water at one time - I just haven't figured out how to carry the darn thing comfortably! I think it's as much to do with the shape of mine as anything else; it's sort of tall and round with a handle that sticks out, which is a hard shape to pack. I'm trying to have one made that's more squat, so it'll be wider than it is tall. I think that'll let me wrap it up in my blanket and carry it on my packframe, and it might make for more efficient cooking - higher surface area to volume, with more of the liquid closer to the heat of the coals (but that could be psuedoscience again!).
- Ned Houndswood, Breelander
Richmond Fantasy-Inspired Hiking and Camping (on WordPress and Facebook)

Return to “Hard Kit”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests